Posters2019-03-06T21:05:40-04:00

Posters

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Promoting provider resiliency and well-being and a positive workplace culture

Description:

The world runs on strong and profound leadership. After his recovery from PTSD and book detailing his journey, police officer Brian Knowler began reflecting on the leadership lessons, both good and bad, which helped him come back. These reflections, supported by conversations with accomplished public safety leaders, led him to conclude that leaders who truly care about the health and wellness of their teams should strive for ‘Capital L’ leadership. Capital L is driven by people, not profit, and those who fail to acknowledge the increasing impact of mental health issues on their teams will inevitably lose the confidence of those they lead. Brian captured these lessons in his second book, which illustrates Capital L leadership using real-life examples from both sides of the leadership desk. During the accompanying presentation, Brian tackles topics including meaningful conversations, knowing and supporting your team, empathy, self-care, living out loud, and how committing “career suicide” can be a fantastic career and personal idea. Mental health issues in the workplace will continue growing in both scope and severity. Modern leaders who wish to truly succeed must be willing to learn and practice skills that will let them successfully champion mental health issues impacting their teams.

Presenters:

Brian Knowler
– Knowler Consulting

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Storytelling is a powerful way to build empathy and effect change on individual, community, and system-wide levels. In the context of mental health and addictions services, stories can surface insights that drive improvement as well as serve as a vehicle for healing. Our presentation will focus on The Better Is Possible Project, a film initiative that shares stories of real individuals who are working through life’s challenges and quietly bringing about change. Led by the Project’s Director and Executive Producer, this presentation will focus on one film in the series that features an individual who has accessed mental health and addictions services in the Region of Waterloo. It will emphasize the importance of introducing storytelling into various aspects of mental health and addictions services, identify how service providers can use these films in their own practice, and share how the act of participating in The Better Is Possible Project contributed to the healing outcomes of the featured individual.

Presenters:

Amanda St. Marie,
Brock Hart,
Rebecca Snow

– Overlap Associates

Donna Pettey has worked for over 35 years in community mental health, including almost 30 years at CMHA Ottawa. Donna is a registered social worker and has a PhD in Population Health.

Frank Sirotich is a registered social worker and the Director of Research and Evaluation at CMHA Toronto. He is an assistant professor (status only) in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, where he completed his doctorate.

Irma Molina is currently coordinating the Peer Program Evaluation Project at CMHA-Toronto. Irma holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Toronto and has done research on topics related to the politics of everyday life and research ethics in context of political instability.